Year 7 Technology Work
Week 1a Week 1b
Design Health and Safety Poster
Week 2a Week 2b Week 3
Methods of Drawing Sketching an idea is drawn freehand in any way that suits the idea you have. For Drawing, an idea is drawn using drawing methods such as Oblique and Isometric. These are 3D methods and allow us to see three sides of an object. See below the example of 2D and 3D
Week 4 Week 5
Isometric Drawing Another method of drawing in 3D is Isometric and shows each side shown equally. Each side shown is displayed at an angle of 30 degrees from the horizontal. see below
2D Design Software to help develop Oblique Drawings on the Computer
Week 6
Use 2D design software to create the above shapes. Once done have a go at developing a design of your own choice. or try this one
Click on the link abaove to download ‘Techsoft 2D Design version 3’ onto your computer. Then use the following Activation Key:    This will allow you to use the software for this Year (2020-21).
1020 FAYH HWWS GWM8 ZGDP
2D Design Software to help develop Oblique Drawings on the Computer
Click on the link abaove to download ‘Techsoft 2D Design version 3’ onto your computer. Then use the following Activation Key:    This will allow you to use the software for this Year (2020-21).
1020 FAYH HWWS GWM8 ZGDP
Use 2D design software to create the above shapes. Once done have a go at developing a design of your own choice, or try this one
Week 7
On 2D Design practice the more advance features of Isometric Drawing and then have a go at drawing a house in Isometric
Week 8
On paper now and complete for HW the more advance features of Isometric Drawing by drawing the house in Isometric by hand
Name: Form: Lesson:
Week 9
Single Point Perspective
In single point perspective drawing, depth is added to a drawing by taking lines to a single vanishing point. We normally draw a crate first that represents the height, length and width of the object that we want to draw. Extra lines are then drawn inside the crate until the shape of our object is drawn feintly.
The outine of the object is then drawn darker over the feint construction lines. The construction lines may be rubbed out using an eraser or if they are very feint, they may be left. Finally the drawing may be rendered by adding light, shade and colour
Week 10
Two Point Perspective Two point perspective drawing is the most difficult method that we normally use to illustrate products. If done well, it is also the most realistic. In two point perspective drawing, we imagine two vanishing points. The two top corners of the page may be used for most purposes. All the lines that are drawn towards the left are drawn to the left vanishing point. All the lines that are drawn towards the right are drawn to the right vanishing point. Vertical lines stay vertical. We normally draw a crate first that represents the height, length and width of the object that we want .
Extra lines are then drawn inside the crate until the shape of our object is drawn feintly The outine of the object is then drawn darker over the feint construction lines. The construction lines may be rubbed out using an eraser or if they are very feint, they may be left. Finally the drawing may be rendered by adding light, shade and colour.
Draw several shapes in Two Point Perspective
Draw several shapes in Single Point Perspective
Write up one page on the material Wood giving examples of the many different types of wood
Wood is categorised into three groups:
Hardwoods come from deciduous trees, which have large flat leaves that fall in the autumn. Holly is one exception to this rule. Hardwoods take longer to grow are not easily sourced and are expensive to buy
Softwood come from coniferous trees. These often have pine needles, and they stay evergreen all year round - they do not loose leaves in the autumn. They are faster growing than hardwoods, making them cheaperto buyand are considered a sustainable material
Manufactured boards are usually made from timber waste and adhesive. To make them more aesthetically pleasing they are often veneered. They are cheap to buy but will need protective coatings for longevity
Week 13
Ferrous Metal Non-ferrous Metal Metals are found naturally and are mined from the earth. metals used in products are extracted from the natural ore using large heat furnaces. They are sold as sheets, bars, rods, tubes and angles. Most metals can be recycled, saving natural resources. Ferrous Metals Ferrous metals contain iron and are magnetic. They are prone to rust and therefore require a protective finish, which is sometimes used to improve the aesthetics of the product it is used for as well Non-ferrous Metals Non-ferrous metals do not contain iron and are not magnetic. They do not rust. Alloys Alloys are mixtures of metal with an element to improve its properties or aesthetics. For example
brass is a mixture of copper and zinc. Alloys can also be clasified as ferrous or non-ferrous. Ferrous metal may require a protective finish. This finish is sometimes used to improve the aesthetics of the product it is used for. To make them
Week 12 Week 11