Year 9 Technology Work
Structures Are designed to carry loads and withstand forces without failing. Therefore stronger structures can Resist stronger Forces
Frame Structures A frame structure is a network of ties and struts joined together. Ties resist tension and struts resist compression. Examples of frame structures include
Systems and Control A system has various parts that work together to perform a set function. Systems can be broken down into these simple stages: The input is a signal, change in the environment, component or process that starts the system off. E.g. the dough fed into a bread machine or a button on a phone being pressed. The process is what happens to the input to change it into an output. Information from the input controls the output. E.g. the skills and labour of the workers in a factory or the working of a computer processor. The output is the result of the system. E.g. the final product on a production line or the sound of a fire alarm.
Mechanical Systems They are used to change the type or size of a motion and force. What kinds of motion?
Types of Mechanisms One of the most common mechanism is the Lever. There are three types of levers and an example of a first class lever is the See Saw that you would often see at a child’s playground.
Other mechanisms are Gears, Pulleys and Cams. In most of the items that we see around the world that have some kind of movement will have one or some of these mechanisms.
Pulley systems:
A Pulley system is used on the Buggy project and each pully is linked by the use of an Elastic Band.
Mechanisms - Pulley Pulleys can be used to help lift objects that are quite heavy, too heavy for a person to lift on their own. By using the pulleys illustrated a user can pull down and lift an object upwards. By increasing the number of pulley wheels the effort required to lift an object is less.
Mechanisms - Other Chain and Sprocket - These are found on bikes. Two sprockets (toothed wheels) are linked with a chain (made up from loads of links).
Combined Systems - Cranes are systems that lift and move heavy loads. They use pulleys to lift the load. The top part of the crane rotates — this is done using gears. The arm of the crane is a lever — the load is balanced with a concrete block.
Isometric Drawing
Evaluation When evaluating a pratical the following needs to be considered 1) Describing what went well. There are many aspects to your practical and all those that you did well at should be mentioned and described in detail. 2) There are some aspects that you found difficult and these to must be thought about so that next time you can look to do better than what you achieved this time around. 3) Practical work involves many techniques and skills that will be used again so its important to note them. 4) These Techniques and Skills can be hard to master so sometimes they need to be practiced so that better outcomes are achieved.
5) Once the practical is completed its important to look at it again and think about how it could have been done better. 6) The Teacher will often make suggestions and these need to be noted as they will help you to get better and achieve better outcomes.
Product Analysis Product analysis is the process of looking very carefully at a product to learn how it is made, what it is made from and how it is used. Undertake a Product Analysis of the following images. Click the images to enlarge them.
Questions: 1) Name the three parts of the pencil sharpeners in Photo. 1. 2) What is the blade made of? 3) State how the blade is fixed in place. 4) Explain how the blade is prevented from moving. 5) Explain why there are two blades in the pencil sharpeners. 6) The pencil sharpeners in Photos 1 & 2 have sloping tops. Explain why. 7) The pencil sharpener in Photo 3 has concave sides. Explain why. 8) Describe the shape of the hole in pencil sharpeners. 9) Explain why some of the corners on the wooden pencil sharpener are rounded off. 10) The pencil sharpeners in Photos 6 - 9 have transparent shaving holders. Explain why.
Options Options Options Options
Polymorph Material Polymorph is a thermoplastic (smart) material that can be shaped and reshaped any number of times. it is normally supplied as granules that look
Other Thermoforming Processes When you heat thermoplastics, they become soft and pliable. You can make loads of shapes out of plastic using thermoforming processes.
Vacuum Forming A vacuum forming machine heats a plastic sheet until it’s soft and then creates a vacuum underneath it (this means the air pressure is removed). Air pressure on top of the plastic then pushes it down over the mould.
Polymorph Project
like small plastic beads. In the classroom it can be heated in hot water and when it reaches 62 degrees centigrade the granules form a mass of ‘clear’ material. When removed from the hot water it can be shaped into almost any form and on cooling it becomes as solid as a material such as nylon. Press Moulding Polymorph The Thermoplastic material is put into a mould. A former is pressed onto it and pushes the plastic into the mould. While pliable at 62 degrees and pressure applied the Polymorph plastic is set into a designed shape.
electricity pylons and houses built around a steel or wooden frame. Often the frame is made up of triangular shapes, because they’re strong. Using triangle shapes in a structure is called triangulation.
Shell Structures Also called sheet structures. The structure is made up of flat or curved pieces joined together. The way the pieces are put together is designed to make a strong, stable 3D shape. Examples include car bodies made of metal panels, or moulded plastic traffic cones.
Injection moulding Hot, soft plastic is squirted into a mould. When the plastic cools it sets and can be taken out of the mould. Blow Moulding A sheet of plastic is heated until soft and placed under a mould. Air is blown under it, forcing the plastic up into the mould. This process is used to make bottles and containers.
Line Bending (Strip Heater) A metal wire is heated to a point that would soften the pastic sheet. The sheet is placed over the metal heated wire and when the plastic is soft enough it is bent to the shape required.
Polymorph Handles Choose your item that you wish to make a Polymorph Handle for
Design Specification Once you’ve got your thought of what is to be made, you need to to draw up a list of features (design criteria) the product you’re designing should have. This list is called a design specification. Here’s an example of a design specification for Scissors: Function — The product should be able to cut paper. Cost — The Scissors should cost no more than £4 to make. Aesthetics — The product should have a soft texture, so it’s comfortable to use. Manufacture — The product should be easy to manufacture. Take no more than 2 hours to make. The Environment — Care must be taken that the materials used are environmentally friendly. Health and Safety — The product should have a safe cutting edge. Safe for children.
Evaluation When evaluating a pratical the following needs to be considered 1) Describing what went well. There are many aspects to your practical and all those that you did well at should be mentioned and described in detail. 2) There are some aspects that you found difficult and these to must be thought about so that next time you can look to do better than what you achieved this time around. 3) Practical work involves many techniques and skills that will be used again so its important to note them
4) These Techniques and Skills can be hard to master so sometimes they need to be practiced so that better outcomes are achieved. 5) Once the practical is completed its important to look at it again and think about how it could have been done better. 6) The Teacher will often make suggestions and these need to be noted as they will help you to get better and achieve better outcomes.
Electronics 1) Conductors and Insulators 2) Voltage, Current and Resistance 3) Components 4) Circuit Conductors is a material that basically allows Electricity to pass through it. Metals are conductors, Water is a conductor and so are you. That is the reason why you can be electrocuted. Conductors have a very low resistance to the flow of Electricity when compared to an Insulator. Insulators are materials that do not allow Electricity to pass through it. Plastics are very good Insulators, also Ceramics and Rubber. Insulators have a very high resistance to the flow of Electricity.
Voltage is the Pressure pushing Electrons through a conductor. Voltage is measured in Volts. Current is the movement of Electrons and is measured in Amperes. A current of 1 Ampere passing through a conductor in 1 second is roughly equivalent to 6.2 million, million, million Electrons passing through. That is a lot!! So if you were to touch that wire then that number of Electrons could be going through you. Scarey thought especially if the Voltage pushing the Electrons was 240volts. That would cause Death!! Resistance is the opposition to the flow of Electricity. All materials have resistance, even the best conductors such as Copper and Gold. THis resistance is measured in Ohms.
Week 1a
Methods of Drawing Sketching an idea is drawn freehand in any way that suits the idea you have. For Drawing, an idea is drawn using drawing methods such as Oblique and Isometric. These are 3D methods and allow us to see three sides of an object. See below the example of 2D and 3D
Recap
Isometric Drawing Another method of drawing in 3D is Isometric and shows each side shown equally. Each side shown is displayed at an angle of 30 degrees from the horizontal. see below
Week 4 Week 5
Lesson 4 - Recap of work done and have a go at drawing a phone freehand in isometric.
Homework - Now use 2D Design to draw the same phone
Click on the link abaove to download ‘Techsoft 2D Design version 3’ onto your computer. Then use the following Activation Key: This will allow you to use the software for this Year (2020-21).
1020 FAYH HWWS GWM8 ZGDP
Lesson 5 - On 2D Design practice the more advance features of Isometric Drawing and then have a go at drawing a house in Isometric
Homework - On paper now and complete for HW the more advance features of Isometric Drawing by drawing the house in Isometric by hand
Week 6 Week 7
Week 10
Click icon left to download Prodexktop on your computer. Click the phone shown below to download a predesigned Circuit. The parts shown below are what is required to be designed using Prodesktop.
Designing the ‘Speaker Box’ with Amplifier
Curving the sides and assemblying Speaker
ProDesktop Car Challenge
for Year 9 Prizes for the best car design
To do at Home, please download Prodesktop from the following website address. www.mvctech.co.uk/software/setup2.zip Once downloaded, double click and ‘Extract all’ files to a selected Destination Then double click ‘PTC ProDESKTOP 2000i2’ to install
Technology computer room will be available Monday, Tuesday and Friday lunchtime for those who wish to do in School. Entries to the competition must be given as a name.des file (Prodesktop File) emailed as an attachment to sreynolds@melbournvc.org
Closing date: 14th December 2020
Week 11
Read through safety rules and then draw a safety poster
Single Point Perspective
In 1 point perspective drawing, depth is added to a drawing by taking lines to a single vanishing point. We normally draw a crate first that represents the height, length and width of the object that we want to draw. Extra lines are then drawn inside the crate until the shape of our object is drawn feintly.
The outine of the object is then drawn darker over the feint construction lines. The construction lines may be rubbed out using an eraser or if they are very feint, they may be left. Finally the drawing may be rendered by adding light, shade and colour
Two Point Perspective Two point perspective drawing is the most difficult method that we normally use to illustrate products. If done well, it is also the most realistic. In two point perspective drawing, we imagine two vanishing points. The two top corners of the page may be used for most purposes. All the lines that are drawn towards the left are drawn to the left vanishing point. All the lines that are drawn towards the right are drawn to the right vanishing point. Vertical lines stay vertical. .
Week 1b Week 2a Week 2b Week 3 Week 8 Week 9